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Author Topic: Ply Dropoffs for HyperLaminates and HyperLayups  (Read 10355 times)

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Ply Dropoffs for HyperLaminates and HyperLayups
« on: June 13, 2008, 10:12:36 AM »
This question was submitted by a user:

There is a picture in your manual describing the hyperlayup in the hat sections.

 What is the break down for I, Z, T?

Is the web always L3, the Top Flng L2 (if existent) and the bottom Flng L4?

« Last Edit: June 13, 2008, 10:33:41 AM by Phil »

Phil

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Re: Ply Dropoffs for HyperLaminates and HyperLayups
« Reply #1 on: June 13, 2008, 10:16:51 AM »
You are correct.  The web is always L3, the top flange (if existent) is always L2 and the bottom flange (if existent) is always L4.   The only exception to this is with the grid stiffened family.  In that family, the 0 degree web is L3, the 90 degree web is L2 and the angled web is L4 (note there are no flanges in the grid stiffened family.  Also note that hyperlaminates or hyperlayups can only be used for stiffeners, therefore you cannot use them for facesheets, etc.
« Last Edit: June 13, 2008, 10:33:53 AM by Phil »

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Re: Ply Dropoffs for HyperLaminates and HyperLayups
« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2008, 06:04:11 AM »
Just a note:
If I understand this correctly the picture in the first post and in the manual needs to be corrected (assuming it depicts a hat stiffener on a skin).
The L4 per the table should be the bottom flange (or what HS calls the “Crown Bottom”), the flange away from the skin, the hat's crown.
The L2 is the “Top Flange”, the flange attached to the skin, the hat’s brim.

Thanks

Phil

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Re: Ply Dropoffs for HyperLaminates and HyperLayups
« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2008, 07:56:33 AM »
Just a note:
If I understand this correctly the picture in the first post and in the manual needs to be corrected (assuming it depicts a hat stiffener on a skin).
The L4 per the table should be the bottom flange (or what HS calls the “Crown Bottom”), the flange away from the skin, the hat's crown.
The L2 is the “Top Flange”, the flange attached to the skin, the hat’s brim.

Thanks for the comment.  Could you clarify what you are saying needs to be corrected in the users manual?  L2 is the top flange (connected to the skin), L3 is always the web and L4 is the hats crown (or flange away from the skin). 

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Re: Ply Dropoffs for HyperLaminates and HyperLayups
« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2008, 11:40:20 AM »
What needs to be corrected is the picture on page 100 of the basic manual and on the first post.
The “Top Flange(L2) – Object 1 should be “Bottom Flange or Hat Crown (L4) – Object 1”
The “Bottom Flange – Object 3 (Hat Crown (L4)  should be “Top Flange(L2) – Object 3”

Phil

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Re: Ply Dropoffs for HyperLaminates and HyperLayups
« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2008, 11:47:04 AM »
What needs to be corrected is the picture on page 100 of the basic manual and on the first post.
The “Top Flange(L2) – Object 1 should be “Bottom Flange or Hat Crown (L4) – Object 1”
The “Bottom Flange – Object 3 (Hat Crown (L4)  should be “Top Flange(L2) – Object 3”
I believe I see the confusion.  The picture is correct.  The HyperSizer Hat Stiffened panel is shown with the facesheet on top.  That figure does not have a facesheet, but perhaps it should.  That would make it less confusing.  L2 is the Top Flange and it is attached to the facesheet, assuming the facesheet is on top.  Our objects are always numbered from the top down.  Perhaps if the image was changed to show the relative position of the facesheet, it would be less confusing.

Phil